Questions For Practical Operating Knowledge

Question File Number 24



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  • You are mobile and talking through a VHF repeater. The other station reports that you keep "dropping out". This means:
    • your signal is drifting lower in frequency
    • your signal does not have enough strength to operate the repeater
    • your voice is too low-pitched to be understood
    • you are not speaking loudly enough
    • ==========================
  • A "pileup" is:
    • an old, worn-out radio
    • another name for a junkbox
    • a large group of stations all calling the same DX station
    • a type of selenium rectifier
    • ==========================
  • "Break-in keying" means:
    • unauthorised entry has resulted in station equipment disappearing
    • temporary emergency operating
    • key-down changes the station to transmit, key-up to receive
    • the other station's keying is erratic
    • ==========================
  • A repeater operating with a "positive 600 kHz split":
    • listens on a frequency 600 kHz higher than its designated frequency
    • transmits on a frequency 600 kHz higher than its designated frequency
    • transmits simultaneously on its designated frequency and one 600 kHz higher
    • uses positive modulation with a bandwidth of 600 kHz
    • ==========================
  • The standard frequency offset (split) for 2 metre repeaters in New Zealand is:
    • plus 600 kHz above 147 MHz, minus 600 kHz on or below 147 MHz
    • plus 600 kHz below 147 MHz, minus 600 kHz on or above 147 MHz
    • minus 5 MHz below 147 MHz, plus 5 MHz kHz on or above 147 MHz
    • plus 5 MHz below 147 MHz, minus 5 MHz kHz on or above 147 MHz
    • ==========================
  • The standard frequency offset (split) for 70 cm repeaters in New Zealand is plus or minus:
    • 600 kHz
    • 1 MHz
    • 2 MHZ
    • 5 MHz
    • ==========================
  • You are adjusting an antenna matching unit using an SWR bridge. You should adjust for:
    • maximum reflected power
    • equal reflected and transmitted power
    • minimum reflected power
    • minimum transmitted power
    • ==========================
  • The "squelch" or "muting" circuitry on a VHF receiver:
    • inhibits the audio output unless a station is being received
    • compresses incoming voice signals to make them more intelligible
    • reduces audio burst noise due to lightning emissions
    • reduces the noise on incoming signals
    • ==========================
  • The "S meter" on a receiver:
    • indicates where the squelch control should be set
    • indicates the standing wave ratio
    • indicates the state of the battery voltage
    • indicates relative incoming signal strengths
    • ==========================
  • The "National System" is:
    • the legal licensing standard of Amateur operation in New Zealand
    • a series of nationwide amateur radio linked repeaters in the 70 cm band
    • the official New Zealand repeater band plan
    • A nationwide emergency communications procedure
    • ==========================
  • A noise blanker on a receiver is most effective to reduce:
    • 50 Hz power supply hum
    • noise originating from the mixer stage of the receiver
    • ignition noise
    • noise originating from the RF stage of the receiver.
    • ==========================
  • The purpose of a VOX unit in a transceiver is to:
    • change from receiving to transmitting using the sound of the operator's voice
    • check the transmitting frequency using the voice operated crystal
    • enable a volume operated extension speaker for remote listening
    • enable the variable oscillator crystal
    • ==========================
  • "VOX" stands for:
    • volume operated extension speaker
    • voice operated transmit
    • variable oscillator transmitter
    • voice operated expander
    • ==========================
  • "RIT" stands for:
    • receiver interference transmuter
    • range independent transmission
    • receiver incremental tuning
    • random interference tester
    • ==========================
  • The "RIT" control on a transceiver:
    • reduces interference on the transmission
    • changes the frequency of the transmitter section without affecting the frequency of the receiver section
    • changes the transmitting and receiver frequencies by the same amount
    • changes the frequency of the receiver section without affecting the frequency of the transmitter section
    • ==========================
  • The "split frequency" function on a transceiver allows the operator to:
    • transmit on one frequency and receive on another
    • monitor two frequencies simultaneously using a single loudspeaker
    • monitor two frequencies simultaneously using two loudspeakers
    • receive CW and SSB signals simultaneously on the same frequency
    • ==========================
  • The term "ALC" stands for:
    • audio limiter control
    • automatic level control
    • automatic loudness control
    • automatic listening control
    • ==========================
  • The AGC circuit is to:
    • expand the audio gain
    • limit the extent of amplitude generation
    • minimise the adjustments needed to the receiver gain control knobs
    • amplitude limit the crystal oscillator output
    • ==========================
  • Many receivers have both RF and AF gain controls. These allow the operator to:
    • vary the receiver frequency and AM transmitter frequency independently
    • vary the low and high frequency audio gain independently
    • vary the receiver's "real" and "absolute" frequencies independently
    • vary the gain of the radio frequency and audio frequency amplifier stages independently
    • ==========================
  • The term "PTT" means:
    • push to talk
    • piezo-electric transducer transmitter
    • phase testing terminal
    • phased transmission transponder
    • ==========================


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Further details about NZART can be obtained from the web at  NZART. There are several categories of NZART membership which include Transmitting and Non-Transmitting. Anyone interested in radio can join. E-mail enquiries to  nzart@nzart.org.nz will bring details about NZART Membership. On-line details about  Joining NZART - Membership has advantages.
Contact Webmaster at e-mail  webmaster@nzart.org.nz
Compiled Sun Nov 28 2010 at 8:42:55pm


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